Need the name of those copies that had purple ink?

They were used in school before copying machines. The ink had a destinctive odor that we all loved for some unknown reason.

11 Answers

  1. mimeograph

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimeograph

    does this make me old because I remember this? :O)

  2. No, NOT Mimeo which used a cut stencil over an inked cloth on a barrel. Mimeo’s could be cranked out in large quantities and the stencil could be saved and reused.

    Ditto machines made the purple copies that faded over time, faster with exposure to light. The master for the Ditto was only good for a limited number of copies as the solvent (Spirit) dissolved the surface of the ink on the master allowing it to be transferred to the special paper.

    Both, as I recall, were hand cranked, but some Mimeo michines probably could have been motorixzed

  3. This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Need the name of those copies that had purple ink?

    They were used in school before copying machines. The ink had a destinctive odor that we all loved for some unknown reason.

  4. Old Copy Machines

  5. It is a mimeograph or a ditto machine.

    Last time I used one was when I was in college about 20 years ago to make copies flyers for our dorm because we didn’t have a Xerox machine.

  6. I believe that it was the mimeograph.

    Edit: A quick qualifier–there’s a related technology called the ditto machine (which I’ve also heard of) that also produced purple impressions.

  7. They were called mimeos – short for mimeograph. That yummy smell is from the alcohol. As a teacher, I used to love to run off copies – and it was good arm exercise!

  8. Oh the SMELL< How I remember the Smell of a freshly run DITTO. Also know as a Mimeograph. Teachers would hand them out when they were still warm and sometimes damp!! loved that smell

  9. Sanware-Bandit Queen

  10. gestetner, named after the manufacturer of the copier machine

Relevant information

How do you make skin tone with colored pencils?

I suggest you get a flesh tone pencil, Though you could always try making one through yellow, orange, pink and brown, but that can be difficult. Even if you have flesh toned pencils, It can sometimes be worth having those around, as accents and blushes.Another SuggestionThe process is a bit time consuming, but ultimately worth the effort. First observe closely the colour of your subject’s skin.For lighter colours ( blondes)I start with a very light base of light purple, then in the areas of shadow I add a touch of pale green, Blend this completely then add a light layer of peach, blend again. In the areas of shadow use terra cotta and more light green, continue blending and adding more colour. Adjust with the light purple and terra cotta for warmer tones, with greens for cooler tones. Your highlights will be light yellows and peaches your shadows need greens and blues. Don’t forget that colours around your subject (found in clothing etc) will reflect onto the skin. Work slow and blend well for the best results.For medium toned skin ( brown hair) start with purple and olive green, add peach and terra cotta, highlight with medium yellow, shadow with olive green and brown.For dark toned skin (black hair and eyes) start with purple and olive green, add terra cotta and brown. Highlight with yellow and shadow with green and brown.

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